NIL: How does it impact ISU and mid-majors? (2022)

In a whirlwind revolution of internal transformation and external litigation, the college athletics landscape bears little resemblance to what it was even five years ago.

Throughout the 2010s, the NCAA tried to put up a dam to protect itself via legislation to mitigate shifts in rules and external definitions of student-athletes the organization (and many of its institutions) did not welcome in full. Try though they might, a deluge of court cases — as well as institutional, public and political sentiment the NCAA could no longer control — hit the organization with full force, and the dam collapsed in a tsunami of change in 2021.

Fans who don’t pay attention to how the sausage is made have found themselves being educated, like it or not, in concepts that were alien until very recently.

The transfer portal — originally conceived in 2018, but changed in 2021 to eliminate the year transferring student-athletes used to have to sit out — was a seismic change. Student-athletes are now free to move about the country, unfettered by institutions and coaches who often put road-blocks in the way of their movement.

However, it’s name, image and likeness that has truly been the game-changer. The ability for student-athletes to be compensated outside of the university environment was considered “cheating” as recently as the spring of 2021. Officially approved in July 2021, NIL and the ability for players to make money has completely changed the dynamic of everything within the college landscape.

NIL has also super-sized the already transformative effect of the transfer portal and has even weaponized it for players and programs alike. The NIL effect has been enormous in all levels of college athletics, but it’s predominantly making headlines at the Power Five level, where there’s more money to spread around and the athletes have a higher profile.

What does NIL mean for Indiana State and its mid-major brethren? NIL hasn’t drastically transformed ISU yet, but rest assured it will.

The school is doing what it can to prepare for when the NIL revolution meaningfully shows up at its doorstep.

TAKE PART OR PERISH

Purely based on raw numbers, you might think NIL has passed ISU by a little over one year into its inception. According to ISU assistant athletic director/compliance Joel McMullen, a total of 12 Sycamores have entered into an NIL agreement. Schools must be informed of all NIL deals in place for their athletes.

“We want our men to explore every option they can to take advantage of their name, image and likeness, and we’ll support them. But it hasn’t hit us like in the way you read about nationally,” ISU football coach Curt Mallory said.

This can lead to the notion the wave of change NIL represents might not impact the mid-major level as acutely as one might think. After all, ISU and its Missouri Valley Conference brethren operate on a different plane than schools in the Power Five universe do. Television contracts pay a minimal amount, the alumni bases aren’t as large, mid-major schools don’t typically have statewide reach and many, including ISU, are in communities without a huge population to sustain a lucrative donor base.

If NIL is a trickle-down proposition, mid-majors are barely getting wet. The most meaningful way mid-majors are being affected by NIL is when players in higher profile sports like football and men’s basketball are picked off by high-majors with the resources mid-majors don’t have at their disposal.

However, ISU athletic brass are not naive. They know the relative current NIL calm isn’t permanent. Eventually, NIL will become a part of the daily landscape as much as it has for high-majors. ISU is doing all it can to be prepared. The first part of the process? Educating fans and donors to let them know what NIL is and that it’s here to stay.

“It starts by sharing with our alumni and donors and fans what’s going on. We have to educate them on what NIL is. We try to educate where we think it’s going knowing full well it’s evolving all of the time,” ISU director of athletics Sherard Clinkscales said.

(Video) UH All-Americans left out of NIL for not being American

Whether a coach, administrator or fan disagrees with NIL philosophically matters not. You have to acknowledge it. You will have to participate in it.

“I get asked what do you think about NIL? My response is that what I think doesn’t matter what I think. If I don’t embrace it, I’ll be coaching high school in four years,” ISU men’s basketball coach Josh Schertz said. “The equivalent of not doing NIL would be the equivalent of going Division I and not giving scholarships. You have to have NIL money to compete for recruits, especially ones in the portal, and to retain good players within your own program. All of the guard rails are off.”

There’s an acknowledgement the biggest revolution in regards to NIL is how it can disrupt the continuity. This is an especially acute issue at the mid-major level, where continuity is a selling point to parents of athletes and for athletes to feel at home in an atmosphere where they could thrive and still have after-college opportunities in a more relaxed environment than the Power Five level.

“At this level, but particularly at our institution, to have success we have to have continuity — which drives sustainability. You’re in an environment right now where everything is designed to fracture continuity,” Schertz said.

Clinkscales and the ISU coaches spoken to all acknowledged the changes in college sports have moved at light speed. Fans who might still embrace the traditional concept of student-athletes who were compensated in the form of an education are being left behind at warp speed by changes that push college athletics closer to the pros in terms of compensation and the chase for more money.

Clinkscales agrees traditional fans are likely shocked by change, but he also noted being shocked by change doesn’t mean ISU can stand pat. And in any case, Clinkscales sees some of the aspects of NIL as having been part of the landscape all along.

“I’ll sound cynical, but some of the things going on now having been going on a long time. People just didn’t know about it, and people in athletics didn’t talk about it,” Clinkscales said. “Has it taken the shine off? The Norman Rockwell feeling? Absolutely, but this has been going on a long time. Now, it’s out there. You have to handle it.”

And part of handling it at the mid-major level is managing money.

REVENUE STREAMS

Though NIL seems to have a Wild West feel to it when you take into account men’s basketball players who have leveraged themselves to the highest bidder, there are rules in place. Schools cannot participate in NIL deals. NIL money has to come from a third party.

It puts every school in college athletics in the bizarre circumstance of having zero control over monetary practices that can dramatically affect their on- and off-field performance. How do coaches square that dynamic?

“I can’t solicit anybody to give anything, but I can explain why it’s important. For a lot of people, this is new, and there’s this idea that it’s cheating in terms of paying players. It was cheating, but now it’s not,” Schertz said. “We also have to underscore that to remain viable in Division I and in the Missouri Valley, we have to be a player in NIL.”

Schertz emphasized, however, “being a player” doesn’t mean having to compete with Power Five schools that can pay a player a six-figure sum.

“We need to let people understand that when they read about Oscar Tshwiebe getting $2 million to go back to Kentucky, we understand we’ll not be at that level, but we don’t have to be. We just have to be good enough to keep the guys we’ll be able to keep,” Schertz said.

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Still, one big NIL concern that hangs over mid-majors is how much blood can be drawn from a smaller stone? Power Five schools, especially ones that are successful, have a seemingly endless supply of supporters who will give until it hurts. For mid-majors? They were very recently just sweating over identifying enough donors to keep up in the facilities arms race. Now, there’s an entirely different beast to feed.

“The more donors you have, the less it’s a concern. If you’re depending on donor money to run your program, the concern level is much higher. There is a fear you wind up with a small group of people, and there’s not enough left,” Schertz said.

ISU offered encouraging news last week when it announced athletics had raised $4.4 million in 2021-22, a record for the school, and an impressive total considering the pandemic was still having a disruptive effect for much of that academic year. ISU isn’t resting on those laurels, though. An NIL collective, as yet unnamed, is being organized for those who want to donate to help keep ISU student-athletes compensated.

“John Newton, an alumnus and long-time employee of the advancement office, now retired, was recommended as someone who can lead this. He and some other people are putting together a collective that people are already contributing to. We’re excited about where this is going. I feel comfortable as an athletic director that someone is doing this that I can trust,” said Clinkscales, who noted his Power Five peers may have more access to money, but it’s often uncontrolled money.

One might think an NIL collective puts it in competition with traditional university revenue development. That’s one way to perceive it, but Clinkscales isn’t comfortable with that context.

“I’ve been very clear with our donors that we have different buckets in which you can give. There’s philanthropy, there’s sponsorships, ticket revenue and NIL. They can choose how to spend their money,” Clinkscales said. “Our job, and the job of everyone in development, is to get past the group of donors we’ve always had and reach out to more to be able to give. In this new world we’re in, we have to continue to expand.”

COACHES OR GENERAL MANAGERS

Another transformative effect of NIL? The definition of coaches has morphed into something unrecognizable to the days where a coach lorded over their programs with dictatorial authority.

The old job of recruiting talent is still there, but the day where a player signed a National Letter of Intent and was handcuffed to a school for their five years of eligibility are long gone.

Clinkscales went straight to the heart of this matter and the fiscal reality for ISU and mid-majors.

“From a philosophical standpoint, with our coaches and where we fit within the pendulum of athletics, what can we do when it comes to NIL for our student-athletes? What I told our coaches was that we’ll be able to retain some, but we won’t be able to buy out anybody. We’re not going to be able to have pay-for-play student-athletes,” Clinkscales said.

So what do you do? More than ever, coaches have to embrace the notion they’re partners in the development of a student-athlete. It’s no longer a top-down relationship.

“We have to have coaches in place who foster strong relationships with our student-athletes. Our university and community have to embrace and love our student-athletes to give them a sense of home and to be comfortable. Then we can meet all of their needs and some of their want,” Clinkscales said. “X’s and O’s are important, but the chemistry part and fitting pieces of the puzzle together are the most important thing. I think we have coaches who can do that.”

It also changes how coaches approach recruiting. Mallory admitted it’s been an adjustment.

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“What we’re looking for is what the right fit is in the portal. NIL is the first question they ask. It’s not always the first answer I want to give about Indiana State. I want to talk more about the people, education, experience or culture. As far as a deal-breaker in recruiting? It hasn’t come up,” Mallory said.

However, it will likely be a deal-breaker at some point. NIL adds yet another layer of pressure when it comes to winning. Win today, get the NIL lucre from the donor base tomorrow. If you don’t, you can suffer the double jeopardy of losing on and off the court.

“What NIL has done is hold coaches even more accountable. You can’t build from the bottom up. You could do a great job recruiting, but suddenly, you lose two kids and you’re right back in the portal. The job of coach has increased exponentially than what it was before,” Clinkscales said. “It changes the way I evaluate their success. It’s tough now. You can do all of the right things and you can lose players and you’re in trouble.”

Clinkscales noted Power Five programs, especially in football, are already hiring assistants who strictly handle the portal. Or, much in the way a capologist operates in the NBA, they go through scenarios on what might happen if a certain player leaves and what options are out there if it comes to pass.

The job of being of head coach is less about coaching the game itself than ever.

“It’s become more like a general manager thing where you’re acquiring and identifying talent. We have the coaches at Indiana State who can do it, but we have to create resources where they can continue to do it,” Clinkscales said.

RETENTION

Perhaps the biggest shock to the traditional system occurred after the men’s basketball season ended for schools in March and April. A heretofore unknown marketplace exploded into an unprecedented college basketball silly season. Players put themselves in the portal, and those who were attractive played off one high bidder against another.

In other words, it was free agency but on a scale unknown in professional sports, where there are rules in place to govern chaos. Coaches are put into a position where they’re re-recruiting athletes on a yearly basis. For a coach trying to build the traditional way via several years of productive recruiting classes? Good luck. A once dependable way to win is now exposed to the twin ravages of the portal and NIL.

“It’s free agency every year with no salary cap rules, no contracts, no tampering rules, no nothing. I don’t know of another sport that exists like that. It has to be looked at. If we’re going to operate like this where it’s a one-year deal every year, it’s hard to build that continuity when you’re building a new team year-in, year-out. It becomes like prep school or JUCO basketball,” Schertz said.

Schertz may decry the new normal, but he is also prepared for it. And he wasn’t surprised by the first offseason of NIL in any case.

“Any time you’re in a business where there’s tremendous publicity and money, you’re opening up opportunities for kids to be exploited. I wasn’t surprised to see this becoming a bidding war. You hope it’s in the kids’ best interest and not the adults. College basketball has always had shady characters behind the scenes. NIL has given those shady characters a real opportunity to con and grift,” Schertz said.

NIL: How does it impact ISU and mid-majors? (1)

(Video) Tennessee's Comprehensive NIL Approach

It’s not impossible to keep players. Schertz is proud he was able to keep nearly all of his players at Division II Lincoln Memorial when many could have moved up to Division I. Tyreke Key, who transferred to Tennessee in April, could have been compensated well had he stayed with the Sycamores, though likely not at a level Tennessee couldn’t afford to match or exceed had it come to it.

Schertz noted the bubble of both the transfer portal and NIL will likely cool over time. If for no other reason than the notion all but a few players hurt their attractiveness as a pro prospect if they’re constantly switching schools. If you’re not good enough to go pro, switching schools constantly also makes it nearly impossible to graduate in a timely manner.

However, college transfers will also not ever return to pre-portal levels either. Coaches have to embrace their role in retaining talent. Schertz identified the biggest key in doing so.

“Kids are going to lean on people around them. There’s a circle of influence in recruiting and with every recruit. It could be a parent or 10 people. You’re recruiting them along with the player,” Schertz explained.

“There are people who creep into that circle of influence. Maybe, a NIL agent. It’s going to take a strong circle of influence where the parents, the coaches and AAU coach are grounded and working in the kids’ best interest. And, sometimes, the best interest is for the kid to leave. If it isn’t, a coach has to be part of that circle of influence.”

REGULATION?

Many in the college world have suggested both the portal and NIL need to be reigned in. Whether via legislation or via NCAA guidelines its disparate membership could agree on, the notion there needs to be guard rails in place to stabilize college athletics to some semblance of what it once was have been much discussed.

However, there is nothing illegal about anything related to either the portal or NIL. Court decisions have confirmed the freedom athletes have to both move around and to make money from their own popularity. Any attempt to legislate college athletics to what it once was would be facing an uphill climb from a legal point of view.

It’s telling when Clinkscales was asked about how realistic it would be to put “guard rails” in place to keep the portal and NIL under control, he let out an audible laugh. Clinkscales does support one idea that might mitigate the effect of losing athletes.

“If you end up losing players, I think the NCAA has to come up with a plan where the school that’s losing players gets to get something back over time just to be able to manage it,” said Clinkscales, who also noted he doesn’t know what form that might take.

Clinkscales is skeptical about the viability of rules that would put college athletics’ toothpaste back in the tube it was in pre-NIL.

“Guard rails? People are going to do what they want to do. If someone wants to start a collective and give our athletes a million dollars, I can’t stop them. There’s nothing I can do,” Clinkscales noted.

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So how does ISU and its mid-major partners respond? The landscape is still evolving, but Schertz has his own plan ... even as he accepts the new normal.

“You better know the people around the recruit and have faith in those people. It’s always been important to me ... who are his people?” Schertz said. “You’d better know them inside and out. There’s no other solution with the way it’s set up today. You can’t cap market value because the market is what people are willing to pay. There’s nothing on the horizon, as coaches, that we think is going to regulate this.”

FAQs

How does nil affect the NCAA? ›

Conceptually, NIL means that college athletes can now earn and accept money doing commercial endorsements, appearances and social media posts, writing books, hosting camps, giving lessons and performing various other commercial activities outside of their schools, all without running afoul of NCAA rules.

What does the term nil mean and why is it so important to college sports? ›

Literally, it means "name, image, and likeness," and refers to college athletes' ability to profit off themselves. NIL gives players the right to publicity that ordinary citizens already have, but that the NCAA previously didn't allow.

What is nil as it relates to college football? ›

What are NIL deals? NIL stands for name, image, and likeness. On July 1, 2021, the NCAA implemented a policy allowing all incoming and current student-athletes the opportunities to earn money from NIL deals.

What is nil when it comes to college sports? ›

Short for Name, Image, and Likeness, an “NIL” refers to the way college athletes can receive compensation. “Using” an athlete's NIL would involve a brand leveraging their name, image, and/or likeness through marketing and/or promotional endeavors.

How does nil affect recruiting? ›

NIL collectives are starting to make an impact on the football recruiting landscape — by offering six- to seven-figure checks to future players. One player will make $500,000, and two others will make at least $1 million, according to The Athletic.

Do you think nil is a good thing why? ›

The Good Of NIL

NIL helps players avoid money traps that in the past have lead to NCAA violations. But it goes beyond that. A few months ago a BYU booster signed all of the walk-on football players to a NIL deal that will help them pay for school. That wasn't allowed until recently.

How much are college athletes making from nil? ›

An estimated $607.4 million could go to Power Five schools, with an average annual compensation $16,074 per athlete, Opendorse said. Already, about three-fourths of the known or forming collectives, which are third-party NIL kingmakers made up of school donors and boosters, are connected to Power Five schools.

What does nil stand for in text? ›

"Nothing" is the most common definition for NIL on Snapchat, WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and TikTok. NIL. Definition: Nothing.

What is nil value? ›

It rather signifies an athlete's value at a specific moment in time. The On3 NIL 100 is the first of its kind and the defacto NIL ranking of the top 100 high school and college athletes ranked by market valuation. Student-athletes can use their NIL Valuation as a way to understand where they stand in the market.

Is there a cap on nil deals? ›

The professional equivalent of NIL deals are pro athletes' off-field endeavors, from businesses to endorsements — and there's no limit to how much an athlete can make on those activities in any law or league rulebook.

What's the difference between nil and zero? ›

nil Add to list Share. Use the word nil to mean "zero," especially when you're talking about scores in a sporting event: "the final score was twelve-nil." Saying nil instead of zero or nothing is much more common in Britain than in the United States.

How many states have passed nil laws? ›

State Law Addressing NIL

As of July 8, 2022, 29 states have passed legislation regulating or otherwise addressing how student-athletes can profit from their name, image, and likeness.

When was the nil rule passed? ›

While other states are starting to make noise in the NIL arena, California and Florida were leaders in the push. California became a trailblazer in NIL legislation when it passed SB 206 September 30, 2019.

What is full form of nil? ›

In general use, nil (a contraction of Latin "nihil") means "nothing" or the absence of something. Sometimes nil is used to mean the number zero (0).

How much are college athletes getting paid? ›

Student Athlete Salary
Annual SalaryMonthly Pay
Top Earners$52,000$4,333
75th Percentile$49,500$4,125
Average$45,360$3,780
25th Percentile$37,500$3,125

Are nil contracts guaranteed? ›

A NIL agreement between a college athlete and a collective that has triggered booster status may not be guaranteed or contingent upon enrollment at an institution. Contracts must be based on an independent, case-by-case analysis of the value each athlete brings to a NIL agreement.

Can college athletes talk to other college coaches? ›

Serious recruiting contact begins either June 15 after sophomore year or September 1 of junior year, depending on the sport and division level. Insider Tip: Athletes can always communicate with college coaches through their club or high school coach and send emails and texts to coaches.

Who is the most followed college athlete? ›

Shareef O'Neal

What negative consequences come with nil deals? ›

“One negative effect that could come from NIL deals is if students do not meet with their compliance officers first and make sure the deal, they are making is legit, it could mess with their eligibility for their sport,” said Shiloh McCool, a student athlete.

What does nil mean for student-athletes? ›

As college athletics continue to grapple with the implementation of a fair and balanced set of rules for student-athletes to monetize their Name, Image and Likeness (NIL), the question of just how much money they could generate has been the subject of much speculation.

Should d1 athletes be paid? ›

Among Americans in general, 51% supported paying college athletes in 2020, according to a study by Ohio State University. In 2019, a combined 53% of students favored or strongly favored paying college athletes a salary, according to CNBC.

What is the highest paid nil deal? ›

High school quarterback and Miami Hurricanes commit Jaden Rashada is said to have signed the biggest NIL deal yet, with a $9.5 million deal.

Do college athletes get free tuition? ›

Most student-athletes do not receive a full-ride scholarship—in fact, only 1 percent do. Still, full-ride scholarships as the goal for many athletes, as they typically cover tuition and fees, books, room and board, supplies, and sometimes even living expenses.

How many college athletes go pro? ›

Do many NCAA student-athletes go on to play professionally? Fewer than 2 percent of NCAA student-athletes go on to be professional athletes. In reality, most student-athletes depend on academics to prepare them for life after college. Education is important.

Where does the word nil come from? ›

From Latin nīl, a contraction of nihil, nihilum (“nothing”).

Does nil mean none? ›

nothing; naught; zero. having no value or existence: His credit rating is nil.

What is correct Nill or nil? ›

As a noun, nill is "Shining sparks thrown off from melted brass" or "Scales of hot iron from the forge". On the other hand, nil is "Nothing; zero". As a verb, nill is " To be unwilling; will not " or " To be unwilling" or " To reject, refuse, negate".

Can colleges pay nil? ›

On June 30, 2021, the Division 1 Board of Directors approved an interim name, image and likeness (NIL) policy. This new policy allows all NCAA D1, D2 and D3 student-athletes to be compensated for their NIL as of July 1, 2021, regardless of whether their state has a NIL law in place or not.

Can college athletes accept money? ›

On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) allowed a ruling that unlocked college athletes getting paid for the first time in history. Today, student athletes can capitalize off their name, image, and likeness (NIL).

How do players get nil money? ›

How can athletes earn NIL money?
  1. Accepting direct payments for promotional activities.
  2. Receiving free or sponsored products in exchange for promotion.
  3. Receiving free or sponsored services in exchange for promotion.
  4. Earning affiliate money from social media promotion.
  5. Becoming an ambassador for a brand or business.
20 Apr 2022

Can d3 athletes get paid? ›

While Division III schools are not able to offer full or partial athletic scholarships, it's important to note that they can provide financial aid to their student-athletes in other ways. In fact, 75% of Division III athletes receive some type of financial aid—which can be need-based or merit-based.

Can the NCAA regulate nil? ›

On June 30, 2021, the NCAA voted to suspend rules prohibiting players from profiting from their name, image, and likeness. Specifically, Individuals can engage in NIL activities that are consistent with the law of the state where the school is located.

Why is it nil instead of zero? ›

Another name for 0 that is used in sports is "nil". This is derived from the Latin word "nihil", which means "nothing". Although common in British English, in football results and the like, it is only used infrequently in U.S. English.

What is the difference between nil and Na? ›

If you have no response for a question, put "none" or "nil" - do not draw a line or write "n.a." or "not applicable." If you fail to answer all the questions, this could create problems with your application, so remember to have an answer for each question.

What means nil in bank account? ›

Zero. Nothing. Nada. The technical term we use is 'nil balance'.

What are nil activities? ›

An “NIL activity” is any business activity in which student-athletes are compensated in any way for the use of the student-athletes' NILs. Examples include personal athletically- or nonathletically-related businesses, social media influencing, promotional appearances, camps, lessons, and autograph sessions.

Is nil legal in California? ›

Gavin Newsom in the fall of 2019, made it illegal for the NCAA universities to prohibit third parties from paying college athletes for use of their NILs in endorsements, sponsorships and other appearances.

Why did Alabama repeal its nil law? ›

The NIL Act's Repeal

“ South said earlier that the NCAA's decision to allow student-athletes to receive NIL compensation meant Alabama's NIL Act was more restrictive, which prompted concerns that Alabama's top-tier universities could be at a recruiting disadvantage.

Who is eligible for nil? ›

The NIL is the ability of college athletes to make money off their "name, image, and likeness." It was instituted in July of last year after the Supreme Court dealt the NCAA an overwhelming loss. The NCAA has long argued that, as amateur athletes, players cannot make money off things like jersey sales and autographs.

Can high school athletes make money off their likeness? ›

"any student-athlete can be compensated for their name, image, and likeness, so long as there is no recognition of the student-athletes' school, school logos, uniforms, or insignia."

What does nil response mean? ›

a reply of zero to a request for a quantified reply.

What is the meaning of two nil? ›

in sport Nil means the same as zero. It is often used in scores of sports games. They lost two nil to the other team. American English: nothing /ˈnʌθɪŋ/ zero.

How do you use the word nil in a sentence? ›

a quantity of no importance.
  1. The new machine reduced labour costs to almost nil.
  2. She claims that the operating risks are virtually nil.
  3. Our team won by two goals to nil.
  4. The final score was three nil/nothing .
  5. Our team won the game three nil.
  6. The final score was Southampton two,[Sentence dictionary] Leeds United nil.
24 Jul 2020

Is nil good for college athletes? ›

Conceptually, NIL means that college athletes can now earn and accept money doing commercial endorsements, appearances and social media posts, writing books, hosting camps, giving lessons and performing various other commercial activities outside of their schools, all without running afoul of NCAA rules.

How often do college athletes get stipends? ›

No. 1 reason: Student athletes already get a yearly stipend with their scholarships. Student athletes on scholarship receive yearly stipends to ensure all their expenses are covered.

What is a D1 offer? ›

A D1 offer from a school means that they are offering you admission to their school as well as a spot on one of their Division 1 sports teams.

How much money are college athletes making from nil? ›

The Opendorse platform said average annual compensation for an athlete in NCAA Divisions I-III combined is $3,438 ( through May 31). By division, DI athletes saw an average of $3,711, $204 in DII and $309 in DIII. Football NIL deals tend to be hefty, with an average of $3,390.95 on Athliance and $3,396 on INFLCR.

Is there a cap on nil? ›

The professional equivalent of NIL deals are pro athletes' off-field endeavors, from businesses to endorsements — and there's no limit to how much an athlete can make on those activities in any law or league rulebook.

How many states have passed nil laws? ›

State Law Addressing NIL

As of July 8, 2022, 29 states have passed legislation regulating or otherwise addressing how student-athletes can profit from their name, image, and likeness.

What is a nil deal in basketball? ›

Last July, the NCAA completely altered the game by allowing student-athletes to start profiting off their name, image and likeness (NIL). If you've been following college basketball for as long as I have, then you should know why student-athletes have been celebrating this decision and the beginning of the NIL Era.

What is the highest paid nil deal? ›

High school quarterback and Miami Hurricanes commit Jaden Rashada is said to have signed the biggest NIL deal yet, with a $9.5 million deal.

How do you make money with nil? ›

How can athletes earn NIL money?
  1. Accepting direct payments for promotional activities.
  2. Receiving free or sponsored products in exchange for promotion.
  3. Receiving free or sponsored services in exchange for promotion.
  4. Earning affiliate money from social media promotion.
  5. Becoming an ambassador for a brand or business.
20 Apr 2022

Who is the most followed college athlete? ›

Shareef O'Neal

Can D3 athletes get nil deals? ›

NCAA approves Name, Image and Likeness (NIL) policy

This new policy allows all NCAA D1, D2 and D3 student-athletes to be compensated for their NIL as of July 1, 2021, regardless of whether their state has a NIL law in place or not.

What is a nil valuation? ›

NIL Valuation is exactly what it sounds like: the monetary value of a given player's name, image, and likeness. In an age where money talks in recruiting, and not under the table, that is an important statistic to keep up with, especially with a last name like Manning.

Can high school athletes make money off their likeness? ›

"any student-athlete can be compensated for their name, image, and likeness, so long as there is no recognition of the student-athletes' school, school logos, uniforms, or insignia."

What are nil activities? ›

An “NIL activity” is any business activity in which student-athletes are compensated in any way for the use of the student-athletes' NILs. Examples include personal athletically- or nonathletically-related businesses, social media influencing, promotional appearances, camps, lessons, and autograph sessions.

Who started the nil? ›

The origin of NIL traces back to the late 2000s when former UCLA basketball player Ed O'Bannon and 19 others sued the NCAA, arguing the organization violated United States antitrust laws by not allowing athletes to make a share of the revenues generated from the use of their in broadcasts and video games.

What does the letters nil mean? ›

Nil is a contraction of the Latin word for "nothing," nihil.

How much do college basketball players make on nil? ›

Three quarters of NCAA athletes have interacted in some level of NIL activity since last July 2021, per Opendorse, which helps facilitate NIL deals. Through May 31, the average NCAA Division 1 athlete had received $3,711 of money through NIL while some big-name players scored high six-figure deals.

How much do nil college basketball players make? ›

How much money can college athletes make with a NIL deal? Broadly speaking, the average income from NIL deals for student-athletes ranges from $1,000 to $10,000, however we've seen cases where some athletes have earned a whole lot more than that.

When was the nil rule passed? ›

While other states are starting to make noise in the NIL arena, California and Florida were leaders in the push. California became a trailblazer in NIL legislation when it passed SB 206 September 30, 2019.

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