First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (2023)

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (1)

Alex Vicente • Updated on August 23, 2022 • [rt_reading_time postfix=”minute”] read

Bringing a new dog home, no matter the age is almost like bringing a new baby home. It is not all playtime and puppy snuggles – though of course, that happens too! You will have to do prep work before your dog gets to their new home to make them feel safe and comfortable. Doing this before your dog gets home will help you focus on the important things when the day comes.

Preparing your home includes closing off areas and removing choking hazards. You will be puppy-proofing the house for your dog’s safety. You will need to purchase basic necessities, like food, a bed, collars, and more to make sure your dog is taken care of from day one. On top of loving your dog, you can do many things to make your dog’s first night the best it can be.

Contents

Table of Contents

Prepare for Your Dog’s Arrival with Basic Necessities

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (2)

You need to gather supplies to prepare for your dog’s arrival, and you can often get a checklist from an animal shelter, breeder, or online for all the new things you need to get before your dog arrives at its new home. These include:

  • Dog food, bowls, and treats
  • Dog bed, crate, and blankets
  • Collars, leashes, harnesses, and poop bags
  • Puppy pads and cleaning supplies
  • Puppy gates and safety measures
  • Plenty of toys

Once you get into a routine with your dog, you will get a better sense of what they need. The above is a great start, but each dog is different, with unique needs, just like humans! The goal is to get them settled smoothly, and having everything ready for them will help with the transition.

Dog food, bowl, and treats

At a minimum, you need to make sure to have something for your dog to eat and to drink. Your dog may already be on a specific food, so make sure to have that in stock. If you plan on starting your dog on a new diet, you will need to slowly transition your dog over the course of a few weeks.

Additionally, you will need to purchase food bowls and water bowls. Depending on the size of your dog, you may want to purchase elevated bowls. The elevated bowls should be as tall as your dog’s lower chest. Your dog should never strain to eat or drink. Treats can help you to start training your dog, coaxing them to explore and complete desired behaviors from day one.

Dog bed, crate, and blankets

(Video) How to PREP for a RESCUE DOG | What to Expect (FIRST NIGHT)

Dogs are den animals, and they want a place to call their own. Dog beds, crates, and blankets will help cultivate this sense in your dog, making them feel safe in their new home. You will want to establish from the first day where your dog will sleep. If the dog is a puppy, you will want to make sure the dog is close to you. They will need to go potty several times during the night.

You may also want to have a blanket or a stuffed animal that smells like their mom or their previous home to make them more comfortable. This will help with the transition. If you and your dog are moving to a new home, make sure to use their old bedding and crates so it is not too much new being introduced all at once. Ease your dog in any new items over time.

Collars, leashes, harnesses, and poop bags

In addition to getting your dog microchipped, a collar with their name and your contact information is essential. In case your dog gets out, there needs to be a clear way for them to get home. Too, you will want to pick up a leash and a harness – especially if your dog is smaller – to make sure that you can get your dog plenty of exercises.

Exercise is very important, especially for new dogs to tire them out, and don’t forget the poop bags. You will need a way to conveniently clean up after your dog when you are out and about. If you plan on taking your dog on long walks or hiking, you can grab portable water bowls. Ultimately, you want to make sure your dog can be taken care of when they are out.

Puppy pads and cleaning supplies

In a new home, puppies and older dogs may have accidents. They could be marking their territories or they could be in the process of being potty trained. Puppy pads are essential if you want to teach your dog safe spaces to potty in the house. You can also lay them under or near the dog’s bed to aid in cleaning up nighttime accidents.

You will want pet spray to help you clean up your dog’s accidents. These specialized cleaners break down the enzymes in urine and feces so they will not leave lingering smells. If you don’t properly clean up, your dog will continue to potty in the same space, This is because they smell the old accident and believe it is okay to do.

Puppy gates and safety measures

Much like when you baby-proof a house, you need to puppy- or dog-proof your house. You can get puppy gates to help section off areas that are and are not appropriate for your dog to go. If you have a small dog, make sure that they cannot slip through the bars on the gate. The last thing you want is for your dog to get into an area that you already closed off.

Remove anything that could be a choking hazard. Your dog may be learning what is appropriate to chew, so you will want to take out anything that you do not want them to teeth on. This could be furniture, power cords, blankets, toys, and so much more. Dogs will chew most things, and if you cannot remove everything, there are chewing deterrents that you can spray.

Plenty of toys

Dogs, like children, love toys! Stuffed animals, balls, chew toys – it doesn’t matter what it is, just that they have plenty to keep their attention on things you want them to chew lest their minds – and mouths – start to wander to things you don’t want them to chew! Supervise your dog and make sure the toys are secure and do not have anything the dog could choke on.

As you get more familiar with your dog, you will learn if they prefer balls to stuffed animals or ropes to rawhides. Make sure to have a selection so they can choose and explore what they like. This will be extra important in a new space.

Show your Dog Around

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (3)

Now that you have all the basics, when you first bring your dog home, you will want to show them around their new home. Lead them through the house, letting them safely explore each space. You can use a leash or let them roam free. You can even use treats to lead them where you want them to go. Keep a close eye so they do not mark their territory.

(Video) FIRST NIGHT WITH NEW RESCUE | ADOPTED | PUPPY | DOG (BEWARE)

Pay extra attention to their areas, including their crate and bed. You may even want to lead your dog into the space so they can begin to feel comfortable with it. Your first day is all about familiarizing your dog with their new home, bonding with them, and starting to build the relationships and the interactions that you will reinforce for many days to come.

If there are any areas you do not want your dog in, keep them gated or the door closed. Your dog will learn which areas are appropriate over time. Just keep in mind that they are curious, so if you accidentally leave the door or gate open, your dog will want to go in, especially since they have never been allowed before!

Familiarize Them with Their Name

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (4)

Hopefully, you have settled on a unique and awesome name for your puppy, and you will want to start training them to answer their names. Call them, and when they respond, give them a treat. Repeat this several times a day until they repeatedly respond to their name with ease.

Make sure you don’t give them too many treats. This could cause their stomach to become upset.

Establish a Feeding Schedule

Setting a consistent schedule for your dog is one of the most important things you can do for them, and this includes feeding them at consistent intervals. For puppies, you will want to likely feed your dog 3-4 meals. For older dogs, you can feed them twice a day. Consult with your vet and read the instructions on your food back for how much you should feed your dog.

Regardless of when you are feeding your dog, they should always have access to fresh water. Keeping your dog hydrated is very important, as dehydration can lead to other health issues.

Start Potty Training

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (6)

New dogs will need to go to the bathroom every few hours, and they will want to relieve themselves within 15 – 30 minutes after eating and almost immediately after taking a nap. You want to start potty training immediately. Lead them to a spot that is appropriate to go potty and wait until they do. Praise them and give them a treat and keep repeating.

Consistency is key when you are potty training your dog, and that first night is no different. Try to anticipate their potty needs. If your dog starts to strike a potty pose, make a loud noise and try to distract them then take them immediately outside. Do not spray them as this negative reinforcement will just teach them to hide their accidents.

(Video) Complete Guide To Adopting/Rescuing A Dog In 2021

You may want to start with a potty pad, moving it closer to the door over time before eventually removing it completely. How ever you plan to housebreak your dog, start as soon as you get in your new home. This will help build those habits that will serve you well in the long term. Remember each dog is different and some are easier to housebreak than others.

Play, Nap, and Repeat

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Dogs are, again, essentially children. They like a lot of playtimes, need a lot of naps, and just when you think you are done, you start the cycle all over again! Once your dog wakes up, be sure to take them outside to go potty immediately or you will be cleaning up an accident. When you are done playing with your dog, take them outside. They have a hard time controlling their bladders when they are excited.

The first night will go much smoother if you tire your dog out with a lot of playtimes during the day. Even with a lot of naps, they will hopefully sleep soundly like a dog who has been thoroughly exhausted can.

Prepare for Bedtime

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (8)

Before your dog comes home, you should have set up their bed. For at least the first few weeks, it should be next to your bed. This will help you to hear them when they wake up in the middle of the night, and you can take them out to keep up the potty training. Because you will be up a lot with your dog, it is recommended that you take a few days off work to help with the training.

Earlier in the day, you should have shown your dog their bed, and they should start to remember this as their den. Lay down a puppy pad in the case of an accident.

Make your Dog Comfortable

Your dog’s bed should be big enough for them to be comfortable, though it may take some time for them to get used to it, especially if they are used to sleeping in a puppy pile. If you have something with their mother or their litter’s scent on it, be sure to add it into their bed. This will help your dog feel more familiar and comfortable.

You can give stuffed animal toys too to help your dog snuggle and feel comforted during the night. Some breeders will even give you a stuffed animal with their heartbeat of their mom recorded as an additional way to soothe your dog.

Take Constant Potty Breaks

You are probably not going to get a lot of sleep the first new night with your dog in your new home. Especially if they are puppies, they will likely wake up every few hours. You will want to take them outside, be patient until they go potty, and give them plenty of praise and treats. Once you get back inside, make sure to put them back in their bed or their crate.

If your dog had an accident, you should still take them outside. This will reinforce that outside is where you go potty. The first night will likely not be the only night with accidents, but you can prevent further ones with consistent and clear direction on where it is appropriate to go potty.

Brace for Crying

(Video) What To Do The First Night You Bring Your Rescue Dog Home

If you already took your dog out, they went potty and they continue to cry, let your dog whimper it out. Crying it out, much like a baby, can be heartbreaking, but it is an important behavior to develop from a young age that crying doesn’t mean you get what you want. Your dog will likely self-soothe within a few minutes and go back to sleep.

Your dog will naturally feel as if they should be sleeping when you sleep. Resist the urge to sleep with them. This will be a hard habit to break. If your dog is having a hard time settling in their crate, talk to them. After 5-10 minutes, they should settle down. You should sleep with the door or cage closed, and as your puppy gets older you can give them more freedom.

Constant Supervision

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Your puppy will be very curious, so you want to make sure that your dog is always supervised. When they are not, they should either be secured in their crate or securely in a closed-off area. Everything they can get into, they will – even things you didn’t realize were possible! It’s much like having a baby that just started crawling – everything is an adventure!

Enjoy the Time Together in your New Home

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (10)

Even as you are preparing for your dog in your new home, do not forget to stop and enjoy the time together! Your first night in a new home together is a really important bonding moment, and it is beautiful, even if it is stressful! All of the training will come with time and patience, so remember to enjoy the ride – and the zoomies. It does not last forever.

The most important thing you can do for your dog is to be consistent. Give them consistent feeding times, potty training, and bedtimes. Routines like daily walks can help them to get in the habit of pottying during a specific time of day or help to tire them out and get rid of their boundless energy.

If you are asking these questions on how to get through your first night, that means you care and you are going to do great with your dog during their first night in their new home. Even if there are mishaps, it will be the perfect start to your life together and you will learn and grow together.

About Alex Vicente

First Night With A Puppy Or Rescue Dog: The Complete Guide (11)

Dog Lover, Founder & Chief Editor at Paws Insider

I’ve been rescuing dogs since a very early age. I got my first dog when I was 9 years old and I remember how he, out of a litter of 6 puppies, started running towards me. He’d just chosen me. Ever since then, my love for dogs only grows stronger and I want what’s best for them. My mission is to let our readers know about the best products in the market for our best friends, as well as providing guides and tips on how we can take better care of them.

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FAQs

Where should a new puppy sleep the first night? ›

On the first night, and for about three weeks, have the puppy sleep in a dog crate next to the bed. Line the base with blankets so that it is cosy and drape another blanket over the top to help it feel more secure. Give the puppy the stuffed toy that has its littermates' scent on it to snuggle up to.

Is the first night with a puppy the hardest? ›

The first few nights at home may be difficult for both you and your pup. At night the puppy will feel lonely and will probably demonstrate this by whining (Oh, you betcha!). These are a few things that you can do that might make the puppy feel at home. Your puppy's sleeping quarters should be in a small crate.

How do I settle my rescue dog first night? ›

The First Night With A Rescue Dog

Leave them and their bed where they are, and go to your own bed. Take them and their bed upstairs to your room with you. Or keep them and their bed where they are, and set up a temporary bed for yourself in the same room.

Should I ignore my puppy crying at night? ›

Ignoring them at night won't help them build confidence and may make them worse which isn't what anyone wants. They need to be taught how to be independent slowly. We would never recommend ignoring your puppy when they cry at night, especially in their first few nights.

Should you let new puppy cry at night? ›

Should I leave my puppy to cry at night? The advice from dog experts is that they shouldn't be left to cry at night. It's likely to increase your puppy's anxiety and may lead to behaviour problems. Not only will you hear it, your neighbors will hear the puppy crying.

Should I put my 8 week old puppy in a crate at night? ›

If you have a puppy that is brand new and between 8-10 weeks old, they should only be in their crate for 30-60 minutes a day. This is because they are still young, potty training, and needing to form attachments to their owners. If your puppy is between 11-14 weeks old, they can be in their crate for 1-3 hours.

What time should a puppy be put to bed? ›

Bedtime: A set bedtime makes his adjustment and house training easier for everyone. It doesn't matter if it's 8 p.m. or midnight, as long as it becomes a routine. Take him to his crate and help him settle down for the night.

What should a puppy do in the first 48 hours? ›

During the first 48 hours with a new puppy, we recommend you stay home, so you can spend as much time as possible bonding with your little companion. If possible, work from home or take a few days off to help your new puppy adjust to its forever home.

How long will puppy cry at night? ›

Puppy crying at night how long does it last? If your puppy has spent the first week or so sleeping next to you, and has now been moved into their permanent night time quarters, you should find that any puppy crying at bedtime will be brief. We're talking ten or fifteen minutes, for maybe a couple of nights.

Should a puppy crate be in your bedroom? ›

Usually the best place for dog crates at night is in the owner's bedroom, so the dog has the feeling of being in safe company during sleeping time. Having the crate in your bedroom will also allow you to hear your dog if she gets restless during the night and needs to be taken to her potty area.

Should I let puppy cry in crate? ›

It is important to allow a puppy crying in their crate to self-soothe a bit to ensure that they do not whine and cry every time they are confined to receive your attention. If you respond too much to a crying puppy in their crate, they will learn to train you!

What is the 3 3 3 rule for adopted dogs? ›

Whether you rescue an older dog or a puppy, a lot of dogs tend to follow the 3-3-3 rule when getting acclimated: 3 days of feeling overwhelmed and nervous. 3 weeks of settling in. 3 months of building trust and bonding with you.

Where should a newly adopted dog sleep? ›

Take your pup to her new sleeping space, which should be set up with a Kong, your old sweatshirt, and a bed for her. If she's not in a crate, I'd recommend putting up some dog gates to keep her in the general sleeping area. If she's sleeping in your bed, just close your bedroom door.

Should I put my rescue dog in a crate at night? ›

Put the crate in your bedroom or close to it when you start crating your dog at night, at least for a while. Rescue dogs are particularly vulnerable to feelings of isolation and fear, which they can experience if you put the crate too far away from you.

Can I leave my 8 week old puppy home alone? ›

8–10 weeks: One hour or less. Puppies this young simply can't hold their urine for more than an hour, and even that is pushing it, sometimes! You might start crate training at this age, but you can't leave a young puppy in a crate for long periods; they'll wet their bed (a lot!)

How do you settle a puppy at night in a crate? ›

Try placing their crate in a quiet corner or a separate, less active room. You can also keep their crate near where you sleep at night, but set up a fan or sound machine to help muffle any noises that might interrupt your puppy's rest.

How do you leave a puppy for the first time? ›

Begin by closing your puppy in the confinement area with a chew toy or other constructive activity, then quietly walk out of the room. Return immediately and reward them with praise and a treat. Repeat the process, slowly increasing how long you're away each time.

Can I leave my 2 month old puppy alone at night? ›

The reality is that a two-month-old puppy is a baby and doesn't know it's time to sleep. Most puppies can't go through the night without needing to eliminate—their bladders are too small. Even though it may take a while, you can teach your puppy to sleep through the night if you are patient and consistent.

Do dogs need a light on at night? ›

Some puppies and dogs prefer a nightlight. They find it comforting. But for others, the light can provide too much stimulation and keep them awake and busy.

Should I cover my dog crate with a blanket at night? ›

You should never completely cover your dog's crate as it can block airflow. Keep blankets away from heat sources, ensure the fabric is breathable, and avoid using knit blankets that may snag or unravel. Monitor the conditions inside the crate in humid summer weather to ensure it doesn't get too hot.

Do puppies sleep a lot when you first bring them home? ›

Dreamland: Young puppies sleep a lot; in fact, some will sleep 16-to-18 hours a day. Plan on several nap times during the day. You may need to put a crate in a quiet part of the house so he won't be disturbed. At night, set a puppy bedtime and help him get used to the routine.

Should I leave the crate door open during the day? ›

Dogs are den animals and even at this very young age they will look to sleep in a confined area that is dark and cozy. Leave the crate door open and your pup will even go nap inside to get away from the light and open space of your home.

Should you wake a puppy to pee? ›

In general, you should not need to wake your puppy up to pee or poop at night. Depending on their age, puppies can sleep through the night provided they received a potty break just before bedtime and they did not have access to food or water at least two hours before bedtime.

What do you do with a puppy all day? ›

We strongly recommend crate training for times when your pup is ready to nap or you need a break. Using puzzle toys and long lasting chews can help your pup enjoy crate time. If you need to get something done around the house like cooking or a phone call, you can always just keep your pup nearby on a leash!

Can a 12 week old puppy sleep through the night? ›

Puppies typically learn to sleep through the night by the time they're about sixteen weeks of age. However, puppy owners can expedite the process by employing some tried-and-true dog training techniques, such as crate training.

Will a puppy pee in his crate? ›

It's completely normal for young dogs to pee in their crates, especially if you're not home to take them out when they need to go. However, if you're home and can't seem to prevent accidents, it's always best to rule out any medical conditions.

Why do puppies cry the first night? ›

Preparing for puppy's first night

As your puppy gets used to their new environment, you'll encounter lots of whining, howling, crying, and barking. But fear not – this is normal behavior for a young puppy and as they settle in, this behavior will stop.

How long will puppy cry in crate? ›

How long should you let puppy cry in crate? You shouldn't leave your dog crying in the crate for more than 10-15 minutes. If they're still crying regularly after this period of time, take a step back and work more on crate desensitization games to build up a positive association with the crate.

How long does it take for a puppy to settle in? ›

There are some things we can do to help them settle and feel safe in those first few days. Keep in mind though, that it generally takes about three weeks for a dog or puppy to start to feel 'at home' and to show their true nature. This is an activity you should do before you get your dog or puppy home.

Should puppies sleep in the same room as you? ›

This is a very personal decision. Some people are happy to have their dog sleep in their bedroom. For others, it's important that their dog sleep in another room. We recommend at least having them in your bedroom with you in the beginning in either a dog bed or crate.

Is it OK to leave puppy downstairs at night? ›

You can also try sleeping downstairs with your puppy if your bedroom is not large enough. Having your puppy next to you also means that you will hear them when they wake up or stir and they will need to go to the toilet……. you can then gently pick puppy up and carry them outside to go to the toilet.

What are puppy blues? ›

The “puppy blues” refers to an emotional state of feeling overwhelmed, sadness, anxiety, or regret that many people experience after bringing home a new dog.

Should dogs have toys in their crate? ›

Unless you want your dog to be bored out of their mind and potentially destructive as a result, it's a good idea to include some toys in their crate while you're out.

When should I stop crating my dog at night? ›

You can usually stop closing your dog into your crate when they are around two years of age. Before then, they are usually more likely to get into trouble. It isn't until they mature fully that they are able to behave properly when not supervised. This is especially true for larger dogs, who tend to mature later.

How do you calm a crying puppy? ›

How to Stop a Puppy From Crying at Night - YouTube

Should I put my 8 week old puppy in a crate at night? ›

If you have a puppy that is brand new and between 8-10 weeks old, they should only be in their crate for 30-60 minutes a day. This is because they are still young, potty training, and needing to form attachments to their owners. If your puppy is between 11-14 weeks old, they can be in their crate for 1-3 hours.

Should a puppy crate be in your bedroom? ›

Usually the best place for dog crates at night is in the owner's bedroom, so the dog has the feeling of being in safe company during sleeping time. Having the crate in your bedroom will also allow you to hear your dog if she gets restless during the night and needs to be taken to her potty area.

How do you make a puppy stop crying at night? ›

How to Stop a Puppy From Crying at Night - YouTube

Do puppies sleep a lot when you first bring them home? ›

Dreamland: Young puppies sleep a lot; in fact, some will sleep 16-to-18 hours a day. Plan on several nap times during the day. You may need to put a crate in a quiet part of the house so he won't be disturbed. At night, set a puppy bedtime and help him get used to the routine.

Should I cover my dog crate with a blanket at night? ›

You should never completely cover your dog's crate as it can block airflow. Keep blankets away from heat sources, ensure the fabric is breathable, and avoid using knit blankets that may snag or unravel. Monitor the conditions inside the crate in humid summer weather to ensure it doesn't get too hot.

Do you let puppy cry in crate? ›

It is important to allow a puppy crying in their crate to self-soothe a bit to ensure that they do not whine and cry every time they are confined to receive your attention. If you respond too much to a crying puppy in their crate, they will learn to train you!

Should you leave water in puppy crate? ›

Do Puppies Need Water in Their Crate? Your growing puppy needs access to plenty of fresh water, but keeping water in her crate is never recommended because it can undermine housetraining. Crate training is a helpful tool in the process because dogs instinctively resist relieving themselves in their den.

Should puppies sleep in the same room as you? ›

This is a very personal decision. Some people are happy to have their dog sleep in their bedroom. For others, it's important that their dog sleep in another room. We recommend at least having them in your bedroom with you in the beginning in either a dog bed or crate.

Is it OK to leave puppy downstairs at night? ›

You can also try sleeping downstairs with your puppy if your bedroom is not large enough. Having your puppy next to you also means that you will hear them when they wake up or stir and they will need to go to the toilet……. you can then gently pick puppy up and carry them outside to go to the toilet.

What are puppy blues? ›

The “puppy blues” refers to an emotional state of feeling overwhelmed, sadness, anxiety, or regret that many people experience after bringing home a new dog.

How long will new puppy cry at night? ›

Puppy crying at night how long does it last? If your puppy has spent the first week or so sleeping next to you, and has now been moved into their permanent night time quarters, you should find that any puppy crying at bedtime will be brief. We're talking ten or fifteen minutes, for maybe a couple of nights.

What should a puppy do in the first 48 hours? ›

During the first 48 hours with a new puppy, we recommend you stay home, so you can spend as much time as possible bonding with your little companion. If possible, work from home or take a few days off to help your new puppy adjust to its forever home.

How do you leave a puppy for the first time? ›

Begin by closing your puppy in the confinement area with a chew toy or other constructive activity, then quietly walk out of the room. Return immediately and reward them with praise and a treat. Repeat the process, slowly increasing how long you're away each time.

What should you not do with a new puppy? ›

DO NOT
  1. Mistreat your puppy by shouting, hitting, or jerking on your puppy's leash.
  2. Call your puppy to you to reprimand it.
  3. Allow your puppy to chase objects like cars, bikes, or skateboards.
  4. Allow your puppy to chase other dogs, cats, or other animals.
  5. Confine your puppy for long periods of time during the day.

What time should a puppy be put to bed? ›

Bedtime: A set bedtime makes his adjustment and house training easier for everyone. It doesn't matter if it's 8 p.m. or midnight, as long as it becomes a routine. Take him to his crate and help him settle down for the night.

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